Tag Archives: Noa

This year’s rams

I often get emails or blog comments containing questions about flock members. If the question can be easily answered in a sentence or two, I reply to the person asking. But when a question requires a bit more depth and is one that I think might interest other blog readers, I’ll use it as a […]

More about spotting

In my last blog, I talked a little bit about my current project, diving into trying to understand spotting in sheep. I’ve collected a database of nearly 300 lambs and have listed them by name, including sire and dam, and type of color. After looking at all of their birth photos, I have also cataloged […]

A sweet time of year

This past weekend began that in-between period that is book-ended on one side by breeding season and at the other by the end of grazing and the eventual start of lambing. The length of this sweet period varies depending on each year’s weather and other factors, but it is most welcome when it arrives. The […]

Trying to figure out Ilaina and Maisie

This is the last week of breeding season at Peeper Hollow Farm. Nearly every week through this breeding season, we have changed the crayons that the rams wear to mark the ewes when they are bred; we’ve gone through yellow, orange, red, and green over these past weeks, and are now on blue. Changing crayons […]

Bored

I realize the sheep in the above photo are very tiny, but that is somewhat the point. Our breeding rams have been among the ewes for nearly three weeks now. The heat cycle of any given ewe averages about seventeen days. Based on my flock, they tend to run from a short fourteen days to […]

Adding Patience to the mix

Most of the time, my flock decisions are based on facts – I like to make these decisions armed with data: average daily gain, fleece produced, the number of lambs produced, etc. I will admit that I have much more difficulty making these same decisions when there isn’t much data available. After all, I am […]

Ready for breeding

This weekend marks the beginning of breeding season at Peeper Hollow Farm, and as such, the start of the 2017 lambing year. This past year’s lambs are mostly sexually mature and no longer small and helpless. Many will, in fact, be in breeding groups next week and deliver lambs of their own in the spring […]